It’s all sports

Jason Kottke sees liking something publicly as a sort of spectator sport.

Coffee, like almost everything else these days, is a sport. Everyone has a favorite team (or coffee making method or political affiliation or design style or TV drama or rapper or comic book), discusses techniques and relives great moments with other likeminded fans, and argues with fans of other teams. The proliferation and diversification of media over the past 35 years created thousands of new sports and billions of new teams. These people turned hard-to-find nail polish into a sport. These people support Apple in their battle against Microsoft and Samsung. This guy scouts fashion phenoms on city streets. Finding the best bowl of ramen in NYC is a sport. Design is a sport. Even hating sports is a sport; people compete for the funniest “what time is the sportsball match today? har har people who like sports are dumb jocks” joke on Twitter. Let people have their sports, I say. Liking coffee can’t be any worse than liking the Yankees, can it?

Right on.

The Coffees:

There are so many potential vices in the world over which one must exert self control: Drinking, food, gambling, etc. These are all fine in moderation, but shouldn’t be over-indulged in lest they become deleterious to health and happiness.

But can’t coffee just be something we drink as much as we want, with no underlying guilt or fear of abuse? COFFEE IS SO DAMN GOOD. The way it flows through your belly and into your veins, making life more vibrant — more full. It is a peerless beverage.

The one rule of coffee drinking

The one rule of coffee drinking